brain injury inflammation

Inflammation and how it’s destroying everyone’s health

Inflammation is part of the body’s natural immune response. brain injury inflammationIt can be beneficial when you’re injured and tissues need care and protection. However, sometimes inflammation can persist longer than necessary, causing more harm than good. Chronic inflammation is at the root of so many illnesses we face today.

For example, brain networks in babies as well as future cognitive development reflect the degree of inflammation their mothers experienced during pregnancy, according to some new studies, leaving them vulnerable to conditions like autism, schizophrenia etc.

Inflammation cooks our genetics & accelerates aging, creating all sorts of pathologies (bipolar disorder, anxiety disorder, depression, epilepsy/seizures, brain tumors, obesity, arthritis, IBS, fibromyalgia etc.) Treating our inflammation can reverse many of these pathologies.

Common causes of inflammation:

1- Diet: Refined flour, refined and excess sugar, oxidized/rancid fats, trans fats, chemicals, preservatives.

2- Obesity: Obesity is an inflammatory state. Your body is struggling and it’s only going to get worse until you do something.

3-Poor gut health: Disruptions in the gut microbiome create intestinal permeability and contribute to systemic inflammation.

4-Stress: Stress stimulates pro inflammatory signalling. Chronic stress=chronic inflammation.

Dental disease, chronic infection, vitamin D deficiency also trigger inflammation in the body.

Our standard American diet is incredibly high in sugar. Sugar is inflammatory and makes our gut more permeable, creating even more inflammation. Inflammation leads to DNA damage, which leads to cancer changes. Reducing your carbohydrate intake, while getting the majority of your carbs from vegetables can really support your body, allowing it to slow and even reverse illness.

For those who need a lot of repair, studies are showing that ketosis repairs DNA, along with increasing mitochondrial function, and therefore increasing brain function. Intermittent fasting and eating high fat/low carbohydrate both put your body into ketosis (where it switches from carb fuel to fat fuel).

Exogenous ketones can be helpful in the beginning as they help to decrease appetite and make the insulin receptors work better (but they cannot replace doing the work). Once our insulin receptors work better, the body doesn’t have to produce as much insulin to get into the cell. So now we can produce less and that inflammatory cascade will start to go down.

How else can we lower inflammation?

  • Good omega-3 & other healthy fats (coconut, olive, avocado, nuts & seeds, fish, free-range eggs, grass-fed meat)
  • Turmeric and pepper together (spices in general are great for your health)
  • Vegetable based diet
  • Movement (30min 5x week min)
  • Sleep. Lack of sleep is really hard on the brain and creates plaque on arterial walls
  • Stress reduction. Make time for the things that feed your soul & help you feel grounded, peaceful, and recharged.

A healthy eating regimen, movement, stress reduction and proper sleep it’s really all we need to reverse most illness. The big people in charge are not interested in spreading this message, so we need to help each other♥️

If you’d like to learn more about how to turn the tables on your illness and paving the way to better health, send me a message and I’d be delighted to help you get started!

 

overworked, stress, HPA-D, HPA axis

HPA axis dysregulation (Adrenal Fatigue)

Most people are familiar with the term Adrenal Fatigue. Adrenal Fatigue is the common term we use for HPA (hypothalamic pituitary adrenal) axis dysregulation. HPA-D is typically due to our modern diet and high-stress culture. These modern stressors affect our HPA axis, which in turn affects nearly every organ & system of the body, including the gut, brain, thyroid, metabolism, catabolism & reproductive system.

overworked, stress

There are 4 major triggers that lead to HPA axis Dysregulation

  1. Inflammation (food sensitivities, dysbiosis etc)
  2. Insulin resistance/poor blood sugar control
  3. Circadian rhythm disruption (not enough daylight, too much light at night)
  4. Chronic stress (real or perceived)

Our body’s protective response to chronic stress is complex. Some of those processes related to HPA-D are:

  1. It down regulates our HPA axis, therefore decreasing our ability to produce cortisol
  2. Cortisol resistance due to decreased sensitivity in cortisol receptors (a reaction to chronic excess)
  3. Decreased bio-availability of cortisol tissue

Other risk factors for HPA-D include: poor diet, stimulants (caffeine, sugar etc.), exhaustive exercise, physical injury, toxins, chronic infections (H.Pylori etc), & autoimmune conditions. Basically all variations of chronic stress on the body.

What can we do?

  1. Diet: Reduce caffeine, avoid sugar, grains and dairy (all 3 are inflammatory) as well as any foods you suspect you may be sensitive to. Optimize you digestion by reducing liquids at meal time, chewing thoroughly and focusing on your food.
  2. Liver Support: Our liver detoxes, produces hormones, regulates various processes, transforms and/or synthesizes nearly everything our body use. Eat cruciferous vegetables and drink lemon water daily,
  3. Immune Support: Licorice root to increase 1/2 life of cortisol (therefore cortisol takes longer to clear the blood). B-vitamins (esp-B5), vitamin C, omega 3 fats,
  4. Reduce Stress: Rest, make time for you and the things that restore & recharge you.
  5. Sleep: Ensure your bedroom is dark, remove electronics, and avoid electronics entirely 1-2 hours before bed. Make sure you get 8 hours sleep. If you don’t feel tired, make a tea, grab a book and go to bed anyway. Or meditate until you’re suddenly asleep (my personal favorite). You can also check out this post for other ideas!fatigue, exhausted

If you suspect you might have adrenal fatigue, and not sure where to start, we can work together to get things turned around!

zinc, exhausted

Is Zinc Deficiency the Reason You Feel Like Sh#t?!

Do you get sick often? Do your wounds heal slowly? Is your memory foggy? Is your attention wavering? Do you have chronically loose stools? Do you suffer from inflammatory skin conditions? Is your sense of taste & smell weak? Is your hair thinning, or even falling out? Has your libido gone down? Has your appetite? If you answered YES! to some of these, you might want to test your zinc levels.

Zinc is an important mineral the body needs for many, many functions. To name a few, Zinc

  • Directs body responses involving the maintenance of enzymes and cells. It contributes to the make up of over 300 types of enzymes and is needed for cell division & cellular metabolism.
  • Prevents oxidation(which creates free radicals and ages tissues), contributing to cellular longevity
  • supports serotonin and melatonin synthesis.
  • Prevents copper excess as they compete for absorption
  • Supports prostate and reproductive organ health
  • Required for DNA synthesis
  • Essential for proper immune function, wound healing, blood stability, formation of insulin, muscle contractability, normal brain function (contributing to mood stability and optimal memory)
  • Protein synthesis, contributing to healthy skin and hair
  • Hormone balance
  • Gut Health

Things that can exhaust your zinc stores are stress, over-training, and pregnancy. Things that can interfere with zinc absorption is poor gut health & excess copper levels.

Zinc deficiency is extremely common. Our soil is more depleted than ever before, rendering our food as a lesser source than it once was. Birth control also depletes our zinc levels. Foods that are still a good source are (highest to lowest):

  • Oysters (by a long shot)
  • Veal
  • Beef
  • Pumpkin Seeds
  • Tahini
  • Dark Chocolate
  • Chicken
  • Beans
  • Yogurt
  • Chickpeas
  • Cashews
  • Cheese
  • Almonds
  • Eggs

Do you intuitively crave any of the above foods? Listen to your body, it is always trying to communicate with you. It is also important to note that many foods, like grains, contain phytates which bind to zinc, making these foods a lesser source of zinc and sometimes interfering with zinc levels in the body. This is one of the reasons that long term consumption of a high-grain or vegetarian diet is considered a risk factor for zinc deficiency.

If you’re curious about whether you might be deficient, book an appointment with me and receive free zinc testing!

Spring is a Time for Change

There’s something about spring that always inspires me to create change. This year I’ve been thinking about my strategy towards my nutrition career and wanted to make some changes that might help things flow more effortlessly.

I’ve been having some conversations with people around social media lately, and while I do enjoy having an online presence, I’ve decided to merge my nutrition account on Instagram with my personal account for simplicity. My food posts will now be on my personal account (wildling83), along with my personal posts, which will in turn give my nutrition contacts a more well-rounded picture of who I am, instead of just one aspect. Seems less fragmented.

Then there’s Facebook. I have a page I use largely for posting my Instagram photos, and also sharing the odd nutrition article I find interesting. I’, thinking of movingthat to my personal page as well. Good idea? Bad idea? Let me know what you think!

Nutritional Support for Pregnancy

Life has been pretty exciting lately. Major highlight: my best friend of over 2 decades is expecting! It’s such a trip. I’ve had other friends have children over the last decade or so, but nothing has felt quite like this. We grew up together, shared so many experiences together, and have become so close. It’s the most excited I’ve ever been about it, and it’s inspired me to post some tips for all the mamas-to-be out there. During your pregnancy, eating healthy is more important than ever, but it doesn’t have to be complicated.

Nutrients

  • Quality Protein: Most women need around 80 grams of protein every day for a healthy pregnancy. It’s literally the building blocks for you and your baby.
  • Healthy Fats: Consuming adequate fats is absolutely vital to baby’s organ and brain development. Also a fat-rich diet will help to reduce stretch marks!
  • Vegetables and Fruits: Vegetables and fruits have a variety of vitamins, minerals and fiber that are helpful during pregnancy. Eating a varied diet including lots of green leafy vegetables can also help raise Vitamin K levels.
  • Water: A woman’s blood volume increases during pregnancy, and her body needs to supply fluid to replenish the amniotic fluid the baby is in. Drinking enough water (around a gallon a day) can help fight off morning sickness and also helps prevent constipation and make sure mom and baby are properly hydrated.
  • Probiotics: Best obtained from fermented foods like kimchi, sauerkraut, kefir or kombucha. Babies are born with a sterile gut and rely on mom’s bacteria to get them going. Don’t underestimate the importance of this. We are only cracking the surface as to what our bacteria does for us (help digest food, create nutrients, send messages to our nervous system) . There are some major medical conditions out there (autism being one of them) that are linked to poor gut bacteria.
  • Omega-3s, DHA, RHA– Adequate good fats are absolutely essential for baby’s development. You can find them in cold water fatty fish like salmon, fresh tuna, or sardines, as well as chia, flax or hemp seeds. It can be hard to to get enough from diet on a regular basis, so you may want to supplement with Cod Liver Oil which also contains vitamin A & D (find a reputable brand).
  • Folate– Well known for its preventative effects against spina bifida and other developmental struggles, folate is another important supplement. Some foods rich in folate are lentils, broccoli, avocado & dark leafy greens.
  • Iron– Anemia can cause serious complications during delivery, and is easy to prevent. You can take a high quality supplement or try cooking with cast iron pans, eating red meat/grass fed liver, beans, pumpkin seeds, molasses and dark leafy greens to help optimize iron levels.
  • Vitamin D – Important for development, you can supplement or get it through sunlight, red meat, fatty fish, mushrooms, cheese, or egg yolks.

Foods

  • Chia & Hemp Seeds: Great sources of Omega 3, fiber, fat, and protein. Will also help keep your colon cleared out, making room for your baby/reducing discomfort.
  • Berries (especially blueberries): Rich in antioxidants, which are important during pregnancy because they reduce oxidative stress. They’re also low in sugar – Bonus!
  • Leafy Greens: Lots of what you need is packed into these foods. They’re rich in folate, easily digested fiber, high in antioxidants, calcium, iron, and much more.
  • Avocados: High in healthy fats, fiber, B-vitamins (including folate), calcium & potassium
  • Lentils: High in protein, fiber and iron!
  • Pumpkin seeds: High in B-vitamins (especially folate), calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc and much more!
  • Sauerkraut: A tablespoon or 2 daily would be a fantastic source of probiotics.  It’s high in fiber, as well as vitamin A, C, K, and B vitamins. It’s also a good source of iron, manganese, copper, sodium, magnesium, and calcium, in addition to contributing a moderate amount of protein to your diet. It’s super easy to make too!

A quick word about supplements

Supplements are not regulated. Many of them are synthetic/unnatural and so the bio-availability is highly questionable. It’s always better to get your nutrition from real, whole food. But life is not perfect, I get it. I take fish oil daily, B vitamins when life is extra busy and multi-vitamins when I don’t make the best food choices. If you decide to supplement, please take a moment to research the brand you’re buying from; don’t buy blindly.

Nutrition Aside..

It’s important to do whatever you can to embody wellness as you start to prepare for the arrival of this tiny human. Some suggestions would be:

  • Take the time to make space (mentally, emotionally & physically)
  • Prioritize sufficient down time & relaxation
  • Get a massage (or give yourself one)
  • Check out some prenatal yoga classes
  • Connect with your baby (touch your belly, talk to them)
  • Download the “I’m expecting” app, which provides you with info on what stages your baby is at, and what food is a comparable size (My friend’s is currently the size of an onion!)
  • Build your support system. Friends and family (bonus if there’s someone who’s been through their own pregnancy, Midwives, and Doulas. Here are some Doula packages my friend Elizabeth Foster offers.

Last but not least, take it all in and enjoy the journey! What a beautiful thing it is to create life♥