cauliflower rice

Ketosis & Intermittent Fasting

Ketosis (which can be induced by eating a ketogenic diet or intermittent fasting) bring many benefits to our health:

  1. Ketones help modulate inflammation
  2. Ketones improve mitochondrial function
  3. Reducing carbohydrate gives your body a chance to modulate it’s insulin response
  4. Ketosis reduces hunger, increases energy & improves cognitive function (making intermittent fasting easier)
  5. Ketosis preserves lean body tissues
  6. Having more balanced blood sugar creates more stability (emotionally & physically)
  7. Ketosis & intermittent fasting help break sugar & alcohol addictions

    almond bread low carb keto

    Almond bread

It takes time for your body to adapt to change, so the trick is to ease into it. For example, week one cute out all processed foods including soda, pastries etc. Week two remove added sugars (in your coffee, oatmeal, smoothies etc.). Week three make some almond bread and cauliflower rice and start reducing bread, rice and other grains etc. etc. As exciting as it is to start something new, there is nothing more discouraging than feeling shitty – and you will if you make dramatic shifts.

cauliflower rice

Cauliflower Rice Goes well with everything

While you are making these small & steady shifts, they and reduce your window of eating. If your first meal is typically 7am and your last intake of food is 10pm, try to shave an hour off each end, a week at a time. That being said, if you’re hungry, eat, but slowly your body will adapt to this (especially as you increase daily fat intake and reduce carbohydrate intake).

Exercise also helps create ketones & improve brain function, so increasing your daily activity can help your body adapt to this shift. Summer is a great time for this 🙂

If you have a serious medical condition, talk to your doctor and have them support you in making this shift (hint: if they don’t want to, your should find a new doctor).

Lastly, be patient, enjoy the process, and remember that not all progress is linear. If you have a high-carb day, reflect on why, let go, and keep moving forward. Your good days will build momentum overtime and you will notice a huge difference.

I’ve been eating low carb and exploring keto eating since early May and I’ve experienced reduced hunger, increased energy and overall more emotional and physical stability. I’ve also lost 5 lbs, which is not what this is about for me, and I’m sure a big portion of it is water weight but it’s nice to look overall less puffy/inflamed.

If you have any questions or curiosity about the above info – send me a message! I’d love to hear your thoughts & help you solve any questions you may have!

overworked, stress, HPA-D, HPA axis

HPA axis dysregulation (Adrenal Fatigue)

Most people are familiar with the term Adrenal Fatigue. Adrenal Fatigue is the common term we use for HPA (hypothalamic pituitary adrenal) axis dysregulation. HPA-D is typically due to our modern diet and high-stress culture. These modern stressors affect our HPA axis, which in turn affects nearly every organ & system of the body, including the gut, brain, thyroid, metabolism, catabolism & reproductive system.

overworked, stress

There are 4 major triggers that lead to HPA axis Dysregulation

  1. Inflammation (food sensitivities, dysbiosis etc)
  2. Insulin resistance/poor blood sugar control
  3. Circadian rhythm disruption (not enough daylight, too much light at night)
  4. Chronic stress (real or perceived)

Our body’s protective response to chronic stress is complex. Some of those processes related to HPA-D are:

  1. It down regulates our HPA axis, therefore decreasing our ability to produce cortisol
  2. Cortisol resistance due to decreased sensitivity in cortisol receptors (a reaction to chronic excess)
  3. Decreased bio-availability of cortisol tissue

Other risk factors for HPA-D include: poor diet, stimulants (caffeine, sugar etc.), exhaustive exercise, physical injury, toxins, chronic infections (H.Pylori etc), & autoimmune conditions. Basically all variations of chronic stress on the body.

What can we do?

  1. Diet: Reduce caffeine, avoid sugar, grains and dairy (all 3 are inflammatory) as well as any foods you suspect you may be sensitive to. Optimize you digestion by reducing liquids at meal time, chewing thoroughly and focusing on your food.
  2. Liver Support: Our liver detoxes, produces hormones, regulates various processes, transforms and/or synthesizes nearly everything our body use. Eat cruciferous vegetables and drink lemon water daily,
  3. Immune Support: Licorice root to increase 1/2 life of cortisol (therefore cortisol takes longer to clear the blood). B-vitamins (esp-B5), vitamin C, omega 3 fats,
  4. Reduce Stress: Rest, make time for you and the things that restore & recharge you.
  5. Sleep: Ensure your bedroom is dark, remove electronics, and avoid electronics entirely 1-2 hours before bed. Make sure you get 8 hours sleep. If you don’t feel tired, make a tea, grab a book and go to bed anyway. Or meditate until you’re suddenly asleep (my personal favorite). You can also check out this post for other ideas!fatigue, exhausted

If you suspect you might have adrenal fatigue, and not sure where to start, we can work together to get things turned around!

Emotional Eating

Let’s be real; we’re all emotional eaters with complex conditioning: genetic, biological, neurological, environmental, cultural etc. Whether you turn to food to sooth emotional discomfort, combat boredom, distract yourself, ease your stress, provide pleasure, rebel against yourself, to fill a void, I think we can all agree that when we’re emotionally eating, we are not in the present moment (eyes glazed over, lost in your thoughts, numb). Emotional eating is an addiction, and addictions are an external answer for an internal problem. You’re trying to change the way you feel, based on how you think it will make you feel. But does it?Continue reading

Mental Health, Digestion and our Microbiome

It’s now widely common knowledge that our gut microbiome influences our digestion, allergies, metabolism and mental health. We’re also realizing how much our brain can influence gut health.

gut-brain

Imbalances in our gut microbiome can eventually lead to systemic inflammation including in your brain, leading to brain fog, fatigue, anxiety, depression and so much more. Going in the other direction, stress (whether conscious or not, acute or chronic) inhibits our digestive function, leading to nutritional deficiencies and an imbalanced microbiome.Continue reading

Candida: a Likely Culprit to your Chronic Symptoms

Candida LOVES sugar!!

Candida is a microscopic organism that typically lives harmlessly in people. A single-cell organism, Candida reproduces asexually and thrives on some of the body’s byproducts: dead tissue and sugars from food. However, if your inner ecosystem is out of balance and your immunity is weakened, you are at risk for Candida overgrowth. Unless its environment is altered and its food sources eliminated, it quickly monopolizes entire body systems, such as the digestive tract, and causes moderate to severe symptoms.Continue reading

The Global Stress Summit & What I’ve Learned

I’ve been tuning into the Global Stress Summit this week where each day several experts speak on the subject of stress.

I have my go-to resources for how I personally cope with stress (yoga, meditation, immersing myself in nature, a relaxing bath with epsom salts & essential oils) and feel like I have a relatively decent understanding of the importance of managing stress and what can happen when you lose your center for too long, but I’m always interested in the chance to add to that knowledge, since it’s such a major part of disease, and an unavoidable part of our reality. Not everyone experiences stress the same, but everyone does feel the pressure that comes from not having enough time, energy or resources to get everything done.

Here are some gems I’ve picked up so far, happy to share with you for your own experimenting:Continue reading

11 Reasons to Hire a Holistic Nutritionist

Nutrition advice is everywhere: talk shows, newspaper headlines, news feeds, personal trainers, friends, and even family members. But how do you know what information is accurate? It can be pretty overwhelming as what seemed healthy one week may be considered unhealthy the next. This is one of the many reasons you should hire a nutritionist – to help you sort out the fact from the fiction.

Nutrition and lifestyle changes have an incredible impact on your overall well being when you make small modifications over time (not all at once). I’ve seen people heal their digestive problems, overcome emotional eating, and reduce their dependence on over-the-counter medication for things like heartburn or chronic migraines. I’ve seen people become energized and vibrant simply by making small and steady changes to their diet and lifestyle.Continue reading

The importance of SLEEP

Sleep is just as crucial for optimal health as nutrition and exercise. There are so many important processes going on while you’re sleeping. The way you feel while you’re awake depends in part on what happens while you’re sleeping. During sleep, your body is working to support healthy brain function and maintain your physical health.

Ongoing sleep deficiency can raise your risk for some chronic health problems. It also can affect how well you think, react, work, learn, and get along with others.Continue reading

gut brain mind body

How our brain can influence our gut health

Inside our digestive tract lies the enteric nervous system, a complex web of neurons that links the gut to the spinal cord and brain.

Nicknamed the ‘gut-brain axis’, this connection often guides the instincts we experience deep within the belly. It also means that what’s going on in our stomachs can impact our brain function, and our thoughts, feelings and emotions can influence our digestion (including the amount of bloating, gas, diarrhea or constipation we experience).Continue reading