Eggs, prosciutto, kale, portobello

My Experience so far with Low Carb/Ketogenic Eating

I’ll be honest, I’d been pretty resistant to learning/accepting ketogenic eating as a sustainable option for myself or my clients. Everything I’d heard sounded so restrictive. This year however I decided to tune into the 2018 Ketogenic Summit; where everyday for 7 days you get 24 hour access to 4-5 different talks with various doctors, scientists and experts who offer their opinion and explain their reasoning.

I was already on board with the position that sugar & inflammation is at the root of so many illnesses we face today, so understanding that reducing your carbohydrate intake can be incredibly beneficial was an easy sell. I’ve also long believed that sufficient amounts of healthy fats are missing in many of our diets today. What was most exciting about this summit was learning the benefits of your body running off ketones instead of glucose.

Luckily I had already done the work of cutting out processed foods and increasing my movement (thanks to my Fitbit), so I looked for a bread substitute, made some cauliflower rice and I was off to the races!

Week 1: I did well 6 out of 7 days. I noticed that I woke up feeling awake, instead of my usual groggy I-don’t-want-to-get-out-of-bed usual feeling. I felt lighter and had more energy, but seemed to be getting afternoon headaches. My mood felt more stable and my stomach didn’t hurt (aside from feeling nauseous twice after eating package-bought spinach dip). I wasn’t hungry all the time.

Week 2: This week was a struggle. It started off by going to a friend’s place for a BBQ. I put some ribs and coleslaw on my plate but then my host added a baked potato to my plate and i decided to eat it instead of refusing it. I also had some red wine over the course of the afternoon/evening. I was surprised the next morning to see trace ketones on my test strip and thought all was well, but what followed was increased carb cravings, more falling off track and feeling tired, unmotivated & emotional. I tried to push though it with increased exercise & better food choices. I had a couple mini meltdowns, but after readjusting my expectations & reminding myself that not all progress in linear, I got myself back on track.

Week 3: This week was my best week. Everyday I kept my carbs at about 10%-15% of total intake (which is higher than what most keto experts recommend) but I felt great all week and my ketone levels were strong. I also found that snacking doesn’t make me feel so good so I started having larger meals and cutting out snacking (mostly). I also lost some weight; 6lbs total since the beginning. Most of it in the 3rd week.

This journey will be an ongoing learning experience for me as I come to understand why I can be in ketosis at higher carb levels than recommended, if this will be true for others, and how this shakes out long term. My intentions are to stay low carb indefinitely, but to continue exploring ketosis for the short term and periodically for health maintenance. I’m pleasantly surprised at how much flexibility it provides. 2 nights in week 3 I enjoyed a couple glasses for red wine, and another day I had some jackfruit that I found fresh for the first time since trying it in Africa in 2008; it was so worth it and didn’t seem to throw me off too much.

If you’re curious about low crab eating or ketogenic eating, send me a message and I’d be happy to offer some basic tips for starting out that can make your first few days/weeks a lot more enjoyable 🙂

Coffee, MCT oil, cinnamon Eggs, prosciutto, kale, portobello Fish, asparagus, cauliflower rice pure kitchen, royal with cheese, burger salad

Spring is a Time for Change

There’s something about spring that always inspires me to create change. This year I’ve been thinking about my strategy towards my nutrition career and wanted to make some changes that might help things flow more effortlessly.

I’ve been having some conversations with people around social media lately, and while I do enjoy having an online presence, I’ve decided to merge my nutrition account on Instagram with my personal account for simplicity. My food posts will now be on my personal account (wildling83), along with my personal posts, which will in turn give my nutrition contacts a more well-rounded picture of who I am, instead of just one aspect. Seems less fragmented.

Then there’s Facebook. I have a page I use largely for posting my Instagram photos, and also sharing the odd nutrition article I find interesting. I’, thinking of movingthat to my personal page as well. Good idea? Bad idea? Let me know what you think!

How stress affects our Biology

Stress is often described as feeling overwhelmed, worried or run-down. It affects people of all ages, genders and circumstances and can lead to both physical and psychological health issues. By definition, stress is any uncomfortable “emotional experience accompanied by predictable biochemical, physiological and behavioral changes”. Some stress can be beneficial at times, producing a boost that provides the drive and energy to help people get through situations like exams or work deadlines. However, extreme and/or chronic stress can have health consequences and adversely affect our musculoskeletal, respiratory, cardiovascular, endocrine, digestive, nervous, reproductive & immune systems.

Musculoskeletal System

When the body is stressed, muscles tense up. Muscle tension is our reflex reaction to stress — the body’s way of guarding against injury and pain. Chronic stress causes the muscles in the body to be in a more or less constant state of guardedness. When muscles are tense for long periods of time, this may trigger other reactions of the body and even promote stress-related disorders. For example, both tension-type headache and migraine headache are associated with chronic muscle tension in the area of the shoulders, neck and head.
Individuals who are fearful of pain and re-injury, and who seek only a physical cause and cure for the injury, generally have a worse recovery than individuals who maintain a certain level of moderate activity. Muscle tension, and eventually, muscle atrophy due to disuse of the body, all promote chronic, stress-related musculoskeletal conditions.
Relaxation techniques have been shown to effectively reduce muscle tension, decrease the incidence of certain stress-related disorders, such as headache, and increase a sense of well-being.

Respiratory System

Stress can also cause our breathing to be shallow and irregular, and can lead to hyperventilation and panic attacks. Deep breathing helps us remain in a relaxed state and helps increase circulation in the body.

Cardiovascular

Chronic stress, or a constant stress experienced over a prolonged period of time, can contribute to long-term problems for heart and blood vessels. The consistent and ongoing increase in heart rate, and the elevated levels of stress hormones and of blood pressure, can take a toll on the body. This long-term ongoing stress can increase the risk for hypertension, heart attack or stroke.
Repeated acute stress and persistent chronic stress may also contribute to inflammation in the circulatory system, particularly in the coronary arteries, and this is one pathway that is thought to tie stress to heart attack. Daily movement & deep breathing promote healthy circulation; which helps to counter the effects of stress.

Endocrine

When the body is stressed, the hypothalamus signals the adrenal cortex to produce cortisol and the adrenal medulla to produce epinephrine. This starts the process that gives your body the energy to run from danger.

Digestion

Stomach

When you’re stressed, your brain becomes more alert to sensations in your stomach. Your stomach can react with “butterflies” or even nausea or pain. You may vomit if the stress is severe enough. And, if the stress becomes chronic, you may develop ulcers or severe stomach pain even without ulcers.

Liver

When cortisol and epinephrine are released, the liver produces more glucose, a blood sugar that would give you the energy for “fight or flight” in an emergency. For most of you, if you don’t use all of that extra energy, the body is able to reabsorb the blood sugar, even if you’re stressed again and again. But for some people — especially people vulnerable to Type 2 diabetes — that extra blood sugar can mean diabetes.
Studies show that if you learn how to manage stress, you can control your blood sugar level as much as you could with medication.

Bowel

Stress can affect digestion, and what nutrients your intestines absorb. It can also affect how fast food moves through your body. You may find that you have either diarrhea or constipation.

Nervous System

When the body is stressed, the nervous system generates what is known as the “fight or flight” response. The body shifts all of its energy resources toward fighting off a life threat, or fleeing from an enemy. The nervous system signals the adrenal glands to release hormones called adrenaline and cortisol. These hormones cause the heart to beat faster, respiration rate to increase, blood vessels in the arms and legs to dilate, digestive process to change and glucose levels (sugar energy) in the bloodstream to increase to deal with the emergency.
This response is fairly sudden in order to prepare the body to respond to the situation at hand. Once the crisis is over, the body usually returns to the pre-emergency, unstressed state.
Experiencing stressors chronically over a prolonged period of time, can result in a long-term drain on the body. As the nervous system continues to trigger physical reactions, it causes a wear-and-tear on the body. It’s not so much what chronic stress does to the nervous system, but what continuous activation of the nervous system does to other bodily systems that become problematic.

Male Reproductive System

Excess amounts of cortisol can affect the normal biochemical functioning of the male reproductive system.
Chronic stress can affect testosterone production, sperm production and maturation, and even cause erectile dysfunction or impotence.
Also, when stress affects the immune system, the body can become vulnerable to infection. In the male anatomy, infections to the testes, prostate gland and urethra, can affect normal male reproductive functioning.

Female Reproductive System

Menstruation
Stress may affect menstruation in several ways. For example, high levels of stress are associated with absent or irregular menstrual cycles, more painful periods and changes in the length of cycles.
Menopause
As menopause approaches, hormone levels fluctuate rapidly. These changes are associated with anxiety, mood swings and feelings of distress. Thus menopause can be a stressor in and of itself. Some of the physical changes associated with menopause, especially hot flashes, can be difficult to cope with. Furthermore, emotional distress may cause the physical symptoms to be worse. For example, women who are more anxious may experience an increased number of hot flashes and/or more severe or intense hot flashes.

Immune

Stress creates chronic inflammatory conditions throughout the body. This along with the issues stress causes in our other systems, creates an endless amount of work for our immune system, eventually weakening it over time.

How we respond to stressors makes a huge difference. Know what soothes your soul and make sure it’s part of your daily routine. For me that’s daily movement, being in nature, and time alone to unwind and reflect. In addition, support your body with the right foods & nutrients, and minimize your exposure to sugar, processed & fried foods that make your body’s job more difficult.

 

If you want to make some changes and need help getting started, send me a message here or book a nutrition & wellness assessment with me here.

Black Bean Avocado Brownies

Confession, I have a pretty serious sweet tooth. I love dark chocolate and sometimes when i avoid it for too long, I end up making poor decisions (aka quick decisions that typically involve junk ingredients). I found this recipe for black bean brownies, tweaked it a little, and love it!Continue reading

Preparing Black Beans From Scratch

I hear you, canned beans are quick and easy. Dried beans need to be soaked for 8 hours, then cooked 40 minutes or longer. That takes time and commitment. But considering that canned beans contain about 100 times the sodium, are more expensive, not as fresh, and could have absorbed endocrine-disrupting properties from the lining of the can, and add to landfills, I like to cook them from scratch.

You can eat them throughout the week, or even freeze some for future use.Continue reading

6 Brain fuel foods that help boost mental performance

teenage-brainLet’s face it, we all like to think we are in control. But the truth is, 90-100% of our decisions come from a primal, instinctual and sub-rational (below the level of conscious reasoning) part of our brain. The part of our brain responsible for conscious thought either provides rationalizations for our sub-rational decisions, or acts as an override mechanism that allows us to revise them.Continue reading

Getting to know your poop

Our poop is about 75 percent water. The rest is a combination of fiber, live and dead bacteria, miscellaneous cells and mucus. The characteristics of your stool will tell you a good deal about how happy and healthy your digestive tract is – the color, odor, shape, size, and even the sound it makes when it hits the water and whether it’s a “sinker” or a “floater” are all relevant information.Continue reading